Archive for Performance Sentry

Help! Do you know if there are any interesting Active Directory Objects or Counters?

NTDS is the main source of information on Active Directory traffic to and from Domain Controllers. It contains a ton of interesting looking counters. Unfortunately, there is not much written that documents AD performance issues and how to use these counters. This TechNet overview article is a good place to start. There are two main […]

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What is the meaning of the message “Insufficient data in performance name table” in the NTSMF.LOG File?

Sometimes the following message is displayed in the “.Log” file: 04/14/08-13:44:04 – Event ID: 2900, Category: Perf Text, Severity: Error Insufficient data in performance name table or 05/17/16-00:00:05 – Event ID: 2902, Category: Perf Text, Severity: Warning Name table located at \windows\system32\perfc009.dat. The following areas of the name table could not be interpreted which could […]

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Why is Performance Sentry not collecting a specific performance counter (or counters) that I need to look at?

There are a number of reasons why Performance Sentry may not be collecting some performance Counter or Counters that you need to look at. Sometimes the reason is fairly trivial and easy to rectify. Sometimes the reason is more difficult to determine. Sometimes, it is a problem with the Performance Sentry collection service itself, which we want you […]

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Is Performance Sentry compatible with the Microsoft Cluster Server?

Yes. Microsoft Corp. defines a server “cluster” as a group of independent servers managed as a single system for higher availability, easier manageability and greater scalability. The minimum requirements for a server cluster, according to Microsoft, are (a) two servers connected by a network, (b) a method for each server to access the other’s disk […]

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What do I need to do to get started with Performance Sentry?

Installation is a three-step process: 1. Prepare the machine you want to use to administer Performance Sentry. Run the Setup program contained on the installation disk to install the Sentry Administration program on the Windows workstation or server you intend to use to administer Performance Sentry. Sentry Administration is used to define and activate performance […]

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Is Performance Sentry easy to install?

Easy as pie. The standard installation package that we ship contains three separate Setup routines that can be run separately or together. One setup routine is used to install the Sentry Administration GUI which is used to administer NTSMF data collection. You can install as many copies of the Sentry Administration program as necessary to […]

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I’m unable to push a new Data Collection Set (DCS) to a 64 Bit Machine

Situation: Performance Sentry Administration is used to assign Data Collection Sets (DCSs) to machines running the data collection service.  An administrator has two options when assigning data collection sets to machines: The first one is called a Registry DCS and the second a File DCS. The Registry DCS parameters are written to the Registry key: […]

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I do not see a drive letter for some of my logical disks. Instead, I see something that looks like HarddiskDmVolumessystemnameDg0Volume1 instead. What is that all about?

Logical disk information containing “HarddiskVolume…” usually indicates an unformatted partition. Knowledge Base article (Q260834) describes the ‘HarddiskVolume’ label as a volume that has been mounted, but not assigned a drive letter. See http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;EN-US;q260834 There is another MS KB entry that specfically discusses “HarddiskDmVolumes” names. See http://support.microsoft.com/?kbid=274311. This It’s type I allowed from do football players […]

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I see a value of 2.63 in the Ave Disk Queue Length Counter field. How should I interpret this value?

The Ave Disk Queue Length Counter is derived from the product of Avg.Disk sec/Transfer) times Disk Transfers/sec, the average response of the device times the I/O rate. This corresponds to a well-known theorem of Queuing Theory called Little’s Law, which states: N = l * Sr where N is the number of outstanding requests in […]

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If I am running multiple instances of SQL Server, how do I figure out which instance of the sqlservr.exe process data maps to which SQL Server instance?

On machines where multiple instances of SQL Server are installed, you will see multiple instances of the sqlservr.exe process running. You will need a procedure for associating the performance data at the SQL Server process level — which provides processor utilization statistics and overall memory consumption — with the SQL Server performance counters for that […]

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