Archive for Windows Performance

How does the Performance Sentry collection service work?

The Performance Sentry collection service gathers performance Objects and Counters from the Windows Server operating system and writes them to the NTSMF collection file. Using Performance Sentry, you can collect any of the performance Objects that are available on your machine, including performance statistics on resource usage, networking, and application performance. In addition, Performance Sentry [...]

Read full story Comments { 0 }

What is the minimum sampling period for Performance Sentry?

The minimum collection interval for Performance Sentry and NTSMF is 1 second.  However, in most cases collecting at a 1 second interval may not be practical. For customers who do require less than 60 second sample intervals we recommend that they pare their data collection sets down to the absolute minimum number of counters for collection.   [...]

Read full story Comments { 0 }

“Have you ever wondered how to determine the logical disk size looking at Performance Monitor performance metrics?”

It is easy, but requires some calculation.  First, look at the logical disk object and add the ‘’% Free Space” and “Free Megabytes” counters to the Perfmon display.  Then switch to ‘Report View’. Figure 1.    Figure 1.  Simply divide Free Megabytes by Free Space (remember this is a percentage, so the displayed value must [...]

Read full story Comments { 0 }

What is the meaning of the message “Insufficient data in performance name table” in the NTSMF.LOG File?

Sometimes the following message is displayed in the “.Log” file: 04/14/08-13:44:04 – Event ID: 2900, Category: Perf Text, Severity: Error Insufficient data in performance name table Concerning the message “Insufficient data in performance name table” refers to the file perfc009.dat that resides in the <Windows>system32 folder. This file contains the names of all installed objects and counters. The [...]

Read full story Comments { 0 }

What is Performance Sentry and how does it relate to NTSMF?

Performance Sentry was originally created as NTSMF. Demand Technology Software was founded in the early days of Windows NT by mainframe performance analysis and capacity planning professionals.  They recognized the need for capturing performance metrics on Windows NT in a fashion similar to the mainframe software called SMF (System Management Facility).  Thus, Windows NT SMF [...]

Read full story Comments { 0 }

How is running Performance Sentry different from Microsoft’s Perfmon or the Windows System Monitor?

Performance Sentry and the Performance Monitor (Perfmon) or System Monitor all access the same performance data and all access it the same way. This performance data encompasses an enormously rich set of metrics on resource usage of key hardware and software components that is available on every Windows server and workstation. We think this is [...]

Read full story Comments { 0 }

What is Performance Sentry and how does it relate to NTSMF?

Performance Sentry was originally created as NTSMF. Demand Technology Software was founded in the early days of Windows NT by mainframe performance analysis and capacity planning professionals.  They recognized the need for capturing performance metrics on Windows NT in a fashion similar to the mainframe software called SMF (System Management Facility).  Thus, Windows NT SMF [...]

Read full story Comments { 0 }

How do I find a memory leak?

A memory leak refers to a programming bug where an application program repeatedly allocates virtual memory, but never deletes it. Eventually, a program with a memory leak will cause something bad to happen. For example, the system or some of its applications might lock up because all the available virtual memory is allocated. Several aspects [...]

Read full story Comments { 0 }

How can I tell how much RAM is being used by application processes and various operating system functions?

It is not possible to get a complete accounting of RAM usage on a Windows, but you can get reasonably close. RAM usage by various OS functions is measured by the following five Memory Object counters: Pool Nonpaged Bytes: these represent allocations directed to the nonpaged pool, which is a set virtual memory pages that [...]

Read full story Comments { 0 }

I see a lot page faults on my system even though there appear to be plenty of Available Bytes. What is going on?

You are probably looking at the Page Faults/sec Counter and interpreting it as the rate of demand paging. Not entirely. In Windows Server, the Page Faults/sec counter includes both hard and soft page faults. (It also appears to include Cache faults/sec, which are application-related file cache read misses.) Instead of using the Page Faults/sec counter [...]

Read full story Comments { 0 }